What a Wonderful World

906 notes

astronomicalwonders:

The Boomerang Nebula
The Hubble Space Telescope has “caught” the Boomerang Nebula in these new images taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys. This reflecting cloud of dust and gas has two nearly symmetric lobes (or cones) of matter that are being ejected from a central star. Over the last 1,500 years, nearly one and a half times the mass of our Sun has been lost by the central star of the Boomerang Nebula in an ejection process known as a bipolar outflow. The nebula’s name is derived from its symmetric structure as seen from ground-based telescopes. Hubble’s sharp view is able to resolve patterns and ripples in the nebula very close to the central star that are not visible from the ground.
Astronomers are uncertain of the cause of bipolar outflow in this, and many other, young nebulae like the Boomerang. It may be that a disk of slow-moving material is situated around the equator of the star, thereby blocking more rapidly moving ejected material there, and allowing only matter closer to the poles to be ejected. Another consideration may be that magnetic fields are responsible for constraining the material and thus causing the double-lobed shape of the nebula.
Bipolar outflows are seen to occur both from very young stars (“protostars”) that are still in the process of collapsing and forming, and from old stars nearing the ends of their lives that have become bloated red giants. The Boomerang is believed to be the ejected outer layers from an old red giant. Each lobe of the Boomerang Nebula is nearly one light-year in length, making the total length of the nebula half as long as the distance from our Sun to our nearest neighbors- the Alpha Centauri stellar system, located roughly 4 light-years away.
Credit: NASA, ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team

astronomicalwonders:

The Boomerang Nebula

The Hubble Space Telescope has “caught” the Boomerang Nebula in these new images taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys. This reflecting cloud of dust and gas has two nearly symmetric lobes (or cones) of matter that are being ejected from a central star. Over the last 1,500 years, nearly one and a half times the mass of our Sun has been lost by the central star of the Boomerang Nebula in an ejection process known as a bipolar outflow. The nebula’s name is derived from its symmetric structure as seen from ground-based telescopes. Hubble’s sharp view is able to resolve patterns and ripples in the nebula very close to the central star that are not visible from the ground.

Astronomers are uncertain of the cause of bipolar outflow in this, and many other, young nebulae like the Boomerang. It may be that a disk of slow-moving material is situated around the equator of the star, thereby blocking more rapidly moving ejected material there, and allowing only matter closer to the poles to be ejected. Another consideration may be that magnetic fields are responsible for constraining the material and thus causing the double-lobed shape of the nebula.

Bipolar outflows are seen to occur both from very young stars (“protostars”) that are still in the process of collapsing and forming, and from old stars nearing the ends of their lives that have become bloated red giants. The Boomerang is believed to be the ejected outer layers from an old red giant. Each lobe of the Boomerang Nebula is nearly one light-year in length, making the total length of the nebula half as long as the distance from our Sun to our nearest neighbors- the Alpha Centauri stellar system, located roughly 4 light-years away.

Credit: NASA, ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team

(via sammicchi)

Filed under faraway lights queue

79,314 notes

clementinemorrigan:

adoptpets:

thenagaqueen:

I have been a cat owner my whole life and I literally never knew that tiger lilies and stargazers were also highly toxic to cats.  Even drinking the water from the vase that lilies are in can kill the cat!  I brought in a tiger lily from our yard today and just thought to look it up and found out (and of course removed the lily from our house as soon as I saw).  How scary!

Other toxic flowers for cats:
Amaryllis (Amaryllis sp.)
Autumn Crocus (Colchicum autumnale)
Azaleas and Rhododendrons (Rhododendron sp.)
Castor Bean (Ricinus communis)
Chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum sp.)
Cyclamen (Cyclamen sp.)
English Ivy (Hedera helix)
Kalanchoe (Kalanchoe sp.)
Lilies (Lilium sp.)
Marijuana (Cannabis sativa)
Oleander (Nerium oleander)
Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum sp.)
Pothos (Epipremnum aureum)
Sago Palm (Cycas revoluta)
Spanish thyme (Coleus ampoinicus)
Tulip and Narcissus bulbs (Tulipa and Narcissus sp.)
Yew (Taxus sp.)

Important info for cat friends!!!

clementinemorrigan:

adoptpets:

thenagaqueen:

I have been a cat owner my whole life and I literally never knew that tiger lilies and stargazers were also highly toxic to cats.  Even drinking the water from the vase that lilies are in can kill the cat!  I brought in a tiger lily from our yard today and just thought to look it up and found out (and of course removed the lily from our house as soon as I saw).  How scary!

Other toxic flowers for cats:

  • Amaryllis (Amaryllis sp.)
  • Autumn Crocus (Colchicum autumnale)
  • Azaleas and Rhododendrons (Rhododendron sp.)
  • Castor Bean (Ricinus communis)
  • Chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum sp.)
  • Cyclamen (Cyclamen sp.)
  • English Ivy (Hedera helix)
  • Kalanchoe (Kalanchoe sp.)
  • Lilies (Lilium sp.)
  • Marijuana (Cannabis sativa)
  • Oleander (Nerium oleander)
  • Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum sp.)
  • Pothos (Epipremnum aureum)
  • Sago Palm (Cycas revoluta)
  • Spanish thyme (Coleus ampoinicus)
  • Tulip and Narcissus bulbs (Tulipa and Narcissus sp.)
  • Yew (Taxus sp.)

Important info for cat friends!!!

(via sammicchi)

Filed under queue oleander and yew are poisonous to humans too

16 notes

birenza:

I don’t do a lot of fan art, as a rule, but I’ve been thinking about The Silmarillion lately, and seeing as it’s Race of Men Week on Tumblr (celebrating the humans of Middle Earth), I thought I’d draw one of my favourite characters from the book. She suffers from the same problem as a lot of neat things in the Silmarillion, namely only really getting a quick summary of her story instead of the full novel she deserves, but that doesn’t diminish how much I like her.
Haleth, daughter of Haldad is, and let me be clear here, completely ace in every respect. She was the leader of one of the tribes of the Edain, the first humans in Middle Earth, after holding off a bunch of orcs in a siege that saw her father and brother both die in quick succession. After the battle, she turns down an alliance with the local elf kingdom and leads her people to go live like forest-loving lumberjack vikings in the woods (which involves a long journey in which lots of them die, but everyone sticks with her because she is, as mentioned, the best). 

birenza:

I don’t do a lot of fan art, as a rule, but I’ve been thinking about The Silmarillion lately, and seeing as it’s Race of Men Week on Tumblr (celebrating the humans of Middle Earth), I thought I’d draw one of my favourite characters from the book. She suffers from the same problem as a lot of neat things in the Silmarillion, namely only really getting a quick summary of her story instead of the full novel she deserves, but that doesn’t diminish how much I like her.

Haleth, daughter of Haldad is, and let me be clear here, completely ace in every respect. She was the leader of one of the tribes of the Edain, the first humans in Middle Earth, after holding off a bunch of orcs in a siege that saw her father and brother both die in quick succession. After the battle, she turns down an alliance with the local elf kingdom and leads her people to go live like forest-loving lumberjack vikings in the woods (which involves a long journey in which lots of them die, but everyone sticks with her because she is, as mentioned, the best). 

Filed under LOTR queue

857 notes

 Gondor! Gondor, between the Mountains and the Sea!
West Wind blew there; the light upon the Silver Tree
Fell like bright rain in gardens of the Kings of old.
O proud walls! White towers! O wingéd crown and throne of gold!
O Gondor, Gondor! Shall Men behold the Silver Tree,
Or West Wind blow again between the Mountains and the Sea?

(Source: alysannemanderly, via alysannemanderly)

Filed under LOTR queue

39,054 notes

i want a word for the almost-home.

that point where the highway’s monotony becomes familiar
that subway stop whose name will always wake you from day’s-end dozing
that first glimpse of the skyline
that you never loved until you left it behind.

what do you call the exit sign you see even in your dreams?
is there a name for the airport terminal you come back to,
comfortably exhausted?

i need a word for rounding your corner onto your street,
for seeing your city on the horizon,
for flying homewards down your highway.

give me a word for the boundary
between the world you went to see
and the small one you call your own.

i want a word for the moment you know
you’re almost home.

there and back again, n.m.h. (via anoraborealis)

(via jdragsky)

Filed under good words. queue Favorite